My Ten Favorite Books

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The Holy Bible

The Holy Bible, the Sacred Traditions, and the Magisterium are the three pillars of faith on which the authority of the Catholic Church relies since the beginning of Christianity. The modern Bible with the 73 books did not exist until 382 A.D. when Pope Saint Damasus I, with the help of Saint Jerome and the entire Church, canonized the 73 books at the Council of Rome. The Holy Bible is the only book that sold at least five billion copies. I cannot imagine life without the Bible.

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The Catechism of the Catholic Church

Our first pope Saint Peter in his letter, the very first encyclical, said that private interpretation of the Sacred Scriptures is prohibited (2 Pt 1:19). Thus, it was necessary for the Church to guard the deposit of faith which the Lord entrusted to His Church. Catechisms sum up the teaching of the Catholic Church in detail. Thanks to God for giving us the mind of Pope Benedict XVI, then a cardinal, who was commissioned Pope Saint John Paul II, along with other cardinals, bishops and other numerous experts in theology and catechesis, the publication of an updated Catechism was made possible in the year 1992. Read the Fidei Depositum here.

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The Starved and The Silent

A holy priest went to Korea to carry out some missionary works for the poor. The country, recovering from the devastating war, was at one point one of the poorest countries in the world. Monsignor John Phillip Aloysius Schwartz (Father Al) wrote his own account of his own struggles and suffering throughout his mission. The heartbreaking story of his young friend, Michael Rhi, is the highlight of the book. Father Al founded the congregations of the Sisters of Mary and the Brothers of Christ. I am one of those who benefited from his saintly works.

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YouCat or Youth Catechism of the Catholic Church

Created especially for the young ones, this abridge version of the Catechism of the Catholic Church comes in an easy to read question and answers form accompanied by tidbits of interesting trivia in the side notes – a must have for the youth. I love the layout, fonts styles, and the images in the book.

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The Chronicles of Narnia

It is one of C.S. Lewis’s best sellers that contains seven interrelated stories. Films were made for the three of those stories namely, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005), Prince Caspian (2008), and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010). Of all works of fiction out there, Narnia is my first choice because of its strong message both for believers and the nonbelievers.

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The Sermons of the Cure of Ars

When I feel the need of something to boost my lukewarm soul I turn to the words of Saint John Marie Vianney, the Cure of Ars. His sermons are so striking one could imagine being admonished by God himself. Some would say his messages does not apply to our own times but for me personally they remind me of the God’s love for each of us.

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Handbook of Catholic Apologetics

Authored by Dr. Peter Kreeft and Fr. Ronald Tacelli, this book is a must-have for Catholics especially those who are doing studies in Apologetics, Philosophy, and Theology. I heard one time in the radio Trent Horn (Catholic Answers apologist) saying this is one of the books that has helped him in the past and would recommend it to everyone.

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Diary of Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska: Divine Mercy in My Soul

Saint Faustina wrote in her diary her private conversations with Jesus. She wrote her life story from her childhood days until the time she received the message of the Divine Mercy and started to propagate the devotion. This hand written account of hers was converted to a book.

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Cries of Jesus from the Cross: A Fulton Sheen Anthology

I was surprised to see its content. Our dear Venerable Fulton J Sheen links the seven last words of Jesus from the cross to the deadly sins of anger, envy, lust, pride, gluttony, sloth, and greed. He counters these vices with the practice of virtues in order to overcome them.

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Marcelino

It’s a story of a young orphan boy left (when he was infant) in a Franciscan monastery because of civil unrest in the nearby village. The boy became a joy of the entire community despite of his little misbehaviors. Things changed after an encounter with someone who has been staying for a while in the friary’s upper room.

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